Study: Exercise helps prevent excess weight gain during pregnancy

Kidney Disease Patients Can Benefit From Exercise: Study

Healthy weight gain in pregnancy is determined by how many babies you’re carrying and your weight (specifically your BMI) when you become pregnant. The Mayo Clinic gives some good guidelines for pregnancy weight gain for carrying one child: Underweight at pregnancy (BMI less than 18.5) – 28 to 40 pounds Normal weight (BMI 18.5 to 24.9) – 25-35 pounds Overweight (BMI 25-29.9) – 15-25 pounds Obese (BMI of 30 or more) – 11-20 pounds If a woman gains too much weight during pregnancy, it increases her risk for complications such as preeclampsia (high blood pressure and excess protein in the urine) and for obesity after delivery, and also ups the baby’s risk for childhood obesity. Many pregnant women have exercise programs, but they tend to focus on physical-activity guidelines of 30 minutes a day. The new research however, found that staying active throughout the day is more beneficial in preventing excess weight gain. For example, a woman who didn’t have a specific workout session but was active all day — such as a waitress or a mother who has young children and is always on the move — would get more exercise and burn more calories overall than a woman who had an exercise session but was otherwise inactive during the day. The findings show that it’s important for pregnant women to increase their overall daily levels of activity.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/study-exercise-helps-prevent-excess-weight-gain-during-pregnancy

Nicole Isbel, of Princess Alexandra Hospital and University of Queensland in Australia, said in the news release. Importantly, patients in the exercise group also showed improved heart function. People with chronic kidney disease have a high risk of premature death from heart disease , the study authors noted. Erin Howden, also of Princess Alexandra Hospital and University of Queensland, stated that the “findings suggest that with the inclusion of structured exercise training and the right team support, improvements in fitness are achievable even in people with multiple health issues.” And Howden added in the news release: “Improvements in fitness translate not only to improved health outcomes, but result in gains that are transferable to tasks of everyday life.” However, before it can be determined that this type of program can help reduce kidney disease patients’ risk of dying prematurely from heart disease, larger studies with longer follow-up are needed, Howden said. About 60 million people worldwide have chronic kidney disease. — Robert Preidt Copyright 2013 HealthDay.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=172945

NORAD To Launch US, Russian Joint ‘Hijacked Airliner’ Exercise Amid Rising Tensions

back to the future galsses

and Russian air forces is set to kick off again this year, despite heightened political tensions between the two nations. Amid heightened political tensions between the U.S. and Russia over a variety of issues, U.S., Canadian, and Russian air forces at least will seek some cooperation next week with a joint exercise over the Bering Sea. The exercise, dubbed Vigilant Eagle , started as an attempt to train to respond to a hijacked airliner that required both Russian and North American intervention. It will pair troops and technology from the joint U.S.-Canadian North American Aerospace Defense Command and Russian Federation Air Force and will last from Aug. 26-30. This year’s drill will feature two scenarios involving international flights, according to a release from NORAD .
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.businessinsider.com/exercise-vigilant-eagle-pair-us-russian-militaries-2013-8

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